Current Projects

Project 1.1.02

How better soil management could affect property prices*.

Project 1.1.02

Professor Mark Morrison – Project Leader
Charles Sturt University

The goal of this project is to understand how soil management practices influence property prices, so farmers can better understand the pay-off from investments in improving soil management. A hedonic pricing model that uses internal and external factors to determine a property’s value or price will be applied.

Hedonic pricing models measure the effect of identified factors on future property prices through statistical analyses that determine the relationship between different data points. To build a hedonic pricing model, it is critical to collect data about property prices and the identified factors. This is what this project will primarily seek out to achieve.

The project has three components:

  1. Data collection of property sale prices
  2. Data collection of contributing factors from a farmer perspective
  3. Training of a research officer in hedonic pricing model analysis

The project team will collect and build datasets on the following:

  • Sources and availability of data required for hedonic price analysis,
  • Soil feature and soil management databases and geographic information system (GIS) layers,
  • Property sale prices,
  • A range of other property characteristics including (farm size, fencing, slope, yield, vegetation, presence of a house, farm infrastructure, accessibility etc.), and
  • Farmer contact details.

The project will involve interviews with farmers and property agents to better understand the factors influencing farmers when purchasing properties.

*This project has additional funding provided by the NSW Government Department of Industry’s Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP).

Related Programs

Project 1.1.03

Project 1.1.03

Consumer demand, the value chain, and communication strategies for promoting soil stewardship

Professor Mark Morrison – Project Leader
Charles Sturt University

The scoping study Activating markets to create incentives for improved soil management literature scoping study identified the lack of research on what consumers know about soil stewardship and its effects on consumer demand.

In the current market, there are not many incentives for the good management of soil. To begin to address this, farmers need a better understanding of the consumer demand for soil stewardship and their willingness to pay. Once this is determined, communication strategies and materials will be developed to promote the use of soil stewardship to consumers. Then the requirements and potential usage of this information by food processors will be examined.

This project will develop and trial a range of different communication materials to educate and promote soil stewardship to consumers in order to determine whether consumers are willing to pay more for food that has been produced using good soil stewardship practices.

The project will also engage with value chain stakeholders to better understand their potential demand for information about consumer’s willingness to pay, perceived obstacles for its usage, and specific information requirements for rewarding farmers for quality practices.

Involving and researching value-chain stakeholders is critical for achieving the goal of financially rewarding famers for improved soil stewardship. Even if consumers are found to be willing to pay for soil stewardship, and this can be activated through effective communications, the end-goal of rewarding farmers through higher prices for their products will not be achieved without the cooperation of critical value chain stakeholders such as food manufacturers and retailers. These intermediaries are essential for presenting soil stewardship attributes on their products and providing financial incentives for landholders.

Related Programs

Project duration

Two years

Participants

Charles Sturt University
University of Tasmania

Project 1.4.01

Innovation capability building*.

Project 1.4.01

Professor David Falepau – Project Leader
Charles Sturt University

Through this project, the Soil CRC will build long term innovation capability within the participating organisations. It will establish innovation partnership agreements and complete innovation strategic plans with Soil CRC partner farmer groups. Innovation programs are often generic, so to avoid this, a program will be tailored to the needs of the Soil CRC participants (including farmer groups) and innovations will be targeted towards achieving greater economic returns on investment in good soil stewardship.

Over the longer term, it is intended the program will integrate across all of the Soil CRC Programs, and participants creating an innovation eco-system targeted at high performance soils.

The building of long term innovation capability within participating organisations is intended to extend the benefits of the Soil CRC investment well beyond the life of the Soil CRC.

*This project has additional funding provided by the NSW Government Department of Industry’s Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP).

Related Programs

Project 2.1.02

Is the isotopic composition of bulk soil carbon and nitrogen a robust indicator of agricultural soil health?*

Project 2.1.01

Dr Naomi Wells – Project Leader
Southern Cross University

The goal of this project is to identify indicators of carbon and nitrogen status in soils that can be used across a wide range of soil types, whilst minimising any possible laboratory bias and also being measurable on archived soil samples.

To establish farm-relevant indicators of soil health, the complexity of overlapping effects of climate, soil type and management practices need to be considered. Data is required on baseline soil nutrient cycling capacity to connect on-farm measurements to soil health.

It is anticipated that the proposed research will outline the local ‘soil health’ definitions that will underpin the next 10 years of Soil CRC research of managing high performance soils across Australia’s diverse climatic growing regions.

*This project has additional funding provided by the NSW Government Department of Industry’s Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP).

Related Programs

Project 2.2.02

‘Smart’ soil sensors

Project 2.2.02

Dr Marcus Hardie – Project Leader
University of Tasmania

There are a range of constraints to the use of soil sensors (moisture) on a farm. This project will develop the next generation of ‘Smart’ sensors that will overcome the problems associated with above ground sensors, transmit data over large areas, and automatically interpret sensed data in order to provide farmers with actionable information rather than just data.

This project will develop the next generation of field-based sensors that can measure, map, interpret, and communicate sensor data using new approaches that meet growers’ need for information in order to make on-farm decisions.

The ‘Smart’ Shovel: A shovel that can measure soil moisture and salinity and will include compaction sensors which will all be mapped and visualised through smart phones whilst in the paddock.

Below Ground Sensor Data Transmission: Send sensor data wirelessly through soil, so that sensors can be fully buried without risk of damage from stock, pests or machinery.

Self-learning moisture sensors: Develop algorithms that use existing soil moisture sensors to learn the soil properties needed for use with models such as APSIM & Yield Profit, and enable growers to relate moisture content to crop stress.

This project seeks to build and develop technologies and provide sensors with the functionalities that growers actually want. They want sensors that do not obstruct machinery and that result in actionable information. This project is the first step in developing the next generation of field-based sensors that growers are seeking to support sustainable and precise management decisions and to improve soil function.

The scope of this project has been intentionally limited to a proof of concept stage, with the understanding that should the proof of concept be successful, further investment will be required to develop a market-ready product or service offering. A utilisation plan will be developed during the second phase of project.

This project will provide farmers with an improvement in on-farm decision making based on data and information, an improved understanding and interpretation of sensed data, improved irrigation and nutrient efficiency, greater uptake of modelling technology, increased profitability and reduced soil damage.

They will run a series of facilitated on-line and in-person meetings among approximately 20 Soil CRC members working with Program 1.2 and 1.3, and in other Soil CRC Programs, in particular Program 4.

Related Programs

Duration

Three years

Participants

University of Tasmania
University of Southern Queensland
Federation University Australia

Project 2.3.01

Visualising Australasia’s Soils:  A Soil CRC interoperable spatial knowledge system

Project 2.3.01

Project Leader – Associate Professor Peter Dahlhaus
Federation University

Data is key to sustainable soil health and profitable agriculture. Following on from the scoping study A review of indicators of soil health and function: farmers’ needs and data management, this project addresses the issue of large amounts of underutilised agricultural data.

The aim of the project is to provide Australasian farmers, agronomy practitioners, agricultural researchers and agribusinesses with relevant place-based information on demand. It will improve soil data availability and encourage the generation of new research ideas, collaborations and investment, both locally and globally.

The Visualising Australasia’s Soils interoperable spatial knowledge system provides the Soil CRC participants, and the broader agricultural industry in general with access to data, information and knowledge on Australasian soils. It includes a data stewardship and governance model for custodians to clearly set the rules under which access to their data, or parts therein, is possible. This will enhance decision making and generate new insights into the profitability and resilience of Australian agriculture.
This project leverages established technologies developed by the lead researchers to federate data from disparate sources in both the public and private sector to make agriculture data more Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR).

The initial focus will be on supporting CRC participants in provisioning soil data and improving data stewardship and governance. CRC participants will also be engaged in the co-development of spatial visualisation, search, filtering and download tools. Education materials will be developed to support broader adoption by farmers and researchers. Longitudinal research will be undertaken to assess practice change and other project impacts.

Collaboratively designing the portal tools, models and visualisations with 15 CRC partners will ensure that the output is a useful, everyday support tool for all Soil CRC participants, and Australian farmers.

Related Programs

Duration

Two years

Participants

Federation University Australia
Landcare Research New Zealand
University of Tasmania
University of Southern Queensland
Birchip Cropping Group
Burdekin Productivity Services
Central West Farming Systems
Gillamii Centre
Herbert Cane Productivity Services
Landmark
Liebe Group
Mackillop Farm Management Group
Mallee Sustainable Farming
North Central Catchment Management Authority
Riverine Plains
Southern Farming Systems
WANTFA
Wimmera Catchment Authority

Project 3.1.02

Biophysical processes for unlocking the soil nutrient bank to increase soil productivity*.

Project 3.1.02

Dr Dane Lamb – Project Leader
University of Newcastle

The goal of this project is to understand the reactions of phosphorous fertilisers in soils and the various chemical and biological processes involved in unlocking phosphorous so that crops can use it, thereby increasing the productivity of Australian agricultural soils.

Although phosphorous is present in significant quantities in many agricultural soils, a majority proportion exists in strongly adsorbed or insoluble inorganic forms, and therefore is not bioavailable to agricultural crops.

Most modern agriculture systems are heavily reliant on recurrent inputs of nutrients including nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur, calcium, magnesium and trace elements. These nutrients are derived primarily from synthetic fertilisers using nutrient rich mineral resources such as phosphate rock and elemental sulphur. With increasing costs of fertiliser production and decline in the supply of natural mineral resources, farmers face the challenge of ensuring crops have sufficient access to the nutrients they need to thrive.

*This project has additional funding provided by the NSW Government Department of Industry’s Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP).

Related Programs

Project 3.1.03

New cost-effective pathways to recover and evaluate high-grade fertilisers from organic waste streams

Project 3.1.03

Dr Dane Lamb – Project Leader
The University of Newcastle

Large scale agricultural systems rely on inputs of nitrogen and phosphorous which can be costly for farmers. Although phosphorous is significantly present in many agricultural soils, the majority exists in strongly adsorbed or insoluble inorganic forms and is not readily available to agricultural crops.

Every year, large quantities of organic waste streams that are rich in these nutrients are produced globally. The total quantity of phosphorous from various waste streams in Australia is around 20 times higher than the current agricultural demand. There is a particularly strong need to recover phosphorus from waste streams due to its dwindling availability from traditional rock phosphate sources. As well as this, the nutrients present in organic waste streams can pose a threat to the environment by nutrient enrichment causing problems such as surface water eutrophication.

This project will develop and optimise novel technologies to recover essential nutrients from organic waste streams such as poultry manure, pig manure, dairy farm wastes, sewage and industrial effluents. This will be done using an energy efficient process thus providing farmers with an efficient, cost-effective fertiliser solution.

This has to be accomplished through inexpensive, locally-sourced nutrient reserves and innovative technologies to ensure cost-effective cultivation and enhanced productivity. The waste-derived fertiliser products will be assessed across a range of farming systems and soil types.

One of the expected outcomes will be increased crop productivity in Australia, which will make contributions to global food security directly and through technology generation.

Related Programs

Duration

Three years

Participants

The University of Newcastle
Griffith University
Southern Cross University
Central West Farming Systems
Primary Industries and Regions South Australia
Australian Organics Recycling Association
South East Water
Herbert Cane Productivity Services
Landcare

Project 3.2.01

Develop and evaluation of novel nano-porous carrier materials to improve pesticide delivery efficiency

Project 3.2.01

Dr Yanju Liu – Project Leader
University of Newcastle

Pests and insects are causing significant damage in agriculture all over the world, requiring significant application of pesticide and insecticide. For example, the cane beetle damages the productivity of sugarcane by feeding on roots and stems, causing losses in hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The traditional application of insecticides has resulted in a large residue of pesticides in soils and surrounding environments, damaging soil enzyme activity and impacting nutrient availability. Key enzyme activities could be improved by controlling pesticide residue to a minimum level.

Nano-porous materials have the potential to encapsulate pesticides and improve their efficiency by controlled release of the active ingredient, thus minimising pesticide residues and damage of soil functionality. This project aims to examine nano-porous materials (either natural or carbon-based materials) as potential carriers to improve pesticide delivery. This will be done through glasshouse evaluation using imidacloprid and cane beetle control as examples.

This is critical for the effective control of cane grubs as well as improved soil performance. Upon development of materials, extended application to other pesticide active ingredients can be evaluated for wider benefits to other agricultural practices.

This project will engage sugarcane famer groups from HCPSL and Burdekin Productivity Services to develop a controlled release insecticide system through collaborative research activities in organisations including University of Newcastle, Griffith University and University of Southern Queensland.

This project will develop a pesticide product that can efficiently control cane beetles using cost-effective, low residue, controlled release of a pesticide delivery system. Following glasshouse evaluation, the product will be demonstrated to farmers groups for future field trails, and manufacturing companies.

Farmers can potentially save resources and gain productivity, reducing economic losses due to cane beetles. Soil functions, such as enzyme activity and nutrient bioavailability, can be improved through limiting the residue of pesticides in soils.

Related Programs

Duration

Three years

Participants

University of Newcastle
Griffith University
University of Southern Queensland
Herbert Cane Productivity Services
Burdekin Productivity Services

Project 3.4.01

Evaluating alternative rhizobial carriers for improving soil performance

Project 3.4.01

Professor Chengrong Chen – Project Leader
Griffith University

Rhizobium inoculation has contributed significantly to the supply of nitrogen in most farming systems, but the availability of peat – the most widely used carrier for Rhizobium – is a non-renewable resource and is becoming increasingly scarce in many regions. As well as this, the existing inoculation techniques often result in low survival rates of rhizobia on the seed and in the soil due to desiccation and heat, and this limits the nitrogen-fixing efficacy of the rhizobial inoculants.

This project will employ a suite of advanced analytical approaches to evaluate the suitability of locally available, low cost organic and inorganic materials, biochars produced from different feed stocks and pyrolysis conditions, and emerging biopolymers as alternative carriers for effectively delivering rhizobia.

The project will also address the issue of capturing and retaining moisture to improve prolonged survival of rhizobial inoculants. There will be new knowledge on cost-effective alternative carriers for formulation of rhizobial inoculants to improve legume nitrogen-fixation and soil productivity in Australian farming systems.
This project will evaluate locally available and newly emerging alternative carriers to provide practical solutions to the desiccation issue through close collaboration with industry and farmer groups.

The key outputs will be the new knowledge on alternative carrier materials for capturing and retaining moisture as well as supporting the growth of rhizobia, and ultimately, other soil performance enhancing bacteria.

Novel alternative carrier products selected and manufactured during this project after glasshouse trials will be gradually adopted in collaboration with inoculant manufacturers to a small scale production for trial by farmer groups.

This project will contribute to economic benefits for farmers through reduced nitrogen inputs, cheaper and more effective inoculants and better crop and pasture yields.

Related Programs

Duration

Three years

Participants

Griffith University
The University of Newcastle
Murdoch University
Central West Farming Systems
WANTFA
Herbert Cane Productivity Services
Burdekin Productivity Services
Australian Organics Recycling Association

Project 4.1.02

Plant based solutions to improve soil performance through rhizosphere modification

Project 4.1.02

Associate Professor Terry Rose – Project Leader
Southern Cross University

Crop diversity in major cropping systems in Australia is limited, yet diversity in farming systems is recognised for providing multiple benefits including resilience, weed and disease suppression and improved soil health. To reverse the decline in species diversity in cropping, this project will identify rotations that enable profitable integration of a range of species into farming systems.

This project will determine how soil performance and profitability are affected by increased crop diversity in rotational systems in both broadacre grains and sugarcane industries. It will investigate the potential for plant-based solutions to improve soil performance through rhizosphere modification.

In glasshouse and small plot trials, the project will identify differences in root exudation and rhizodeposition, and root depth and distribution, between various crop types and link these to changes in soil biology, porosity and nutrient cycling. These ultimately contribute to the soil’s ability to sustain healthy, high yielding crops.

Long term (greater than 5 years) field experiments will assess the viability of integrating diverse species into the system as winter rotation crops, summer cover crops or perennial legumes depending on the constraints of climate, soils and weeds. Long-term field trials are essential as it has been established that outcomes from rhizosphere re-engineering are not immediate and improvements in productivity and resilience are not seen in short-term experiments.

The project will involve direct adoption of agronomic practices by Grower Group networks and beyond which will deliver improved soil health, increased soil resilience to stressors and improved farm profitability.

The impact of the project will be enhanced soil resilience leading to more profitable and sustainable grain and sugarcane farming systems through the use of diverse cropping rotations.

Related Programs

Duration

Four years

Participants

Southern Cross University
Central West Farming Systems
NSW Department of Primary Industries
Murdoch University, Charles Sturt University
Burdekin Productivity Services
Herbert Cane Productivity Services
Farmlink
Hart Field Site Group
Riverine Plains
WANTFA

Project 4.2.01

Developing knowledge and tools to better manage herbicide residues in soil

Project 4.2.01

Dr Michael Rose – Project Leader
NSW Department of Primary Industries

The loss of productivity due to herbicide residues as a soil constraint has not been accurately determined due to the complexity and lack of tools to quantify herbicide damage. However, it is thought to be significant, particularly in sandy soils.

Herbicides are a valuable tool for controlling weeds and realising crop yield potential. Currently, herbicide label guidelines are general and unable to account for the combinations of soil types and weather conditions that can affect herbicide persistence in soil. Herbicide residues in soils can limit crop performance if not managed correctly. It is difficult for growers and advisors to know whether herbicide residues will cause issues, because the persistence and behaviour of these residues depends on numerous site-specific factors, including soil and climatic conditions.

Increased weed resistance to herbicides means that many growers are increasing application doses and frequency, increasing the range of herbicides used and importantly, returning to pre-emergent residual herbicides.

Growers need evidence-backed guidance on the site-specific persistence of herbicides to allow for flexible crop selection and avoidance of plant-back damage, and field-validated information on the potential long-term effects of herbicide residues on soil and crop health.

There are currently very few tools to assist growers to determine the level of herbicide residues present, and if they negatively affect soil and crop performance. This project will develop new knowledge and tools to better understand the factors regulating herbicide persistence and bioavailability. This will give farmers an increased confidence in crop choice, timing of sowing and herbicide management to ensure soil and crop performance are not limited by herbicide residues.

The outcome will be that farmers are better informed and equipped to react to variable environmental and soil conditions, which will reduce risk and increase crop diversity, yields and economic returns at a lower environmental cost. Importantly, major losses after planting will be eliminated and farmers will have greater flexibility in crop rotations to further build soil health.

Related Programs

Duration

Three years

Participants

NSW Department of Primary Industries
Murdoch University
Southern Cross University
WANTFA
Hart Field Site Group
Birchip Cropping Group

Project 4.3.02

Improving the representation of soil productivity/constraints in existing decision support systems and modelling platforms

Project 4.3.02

Dr Keith Pembleton – Project Leader
University of Southern Queensland

Farmers face multiple, complex soil constraints that are difficult and costly to diagnose, assess and ameliorate.

Following on from the scoping study Soil models, tools and data: Current state of play, future directions and setting up for longevity and a legacy from the CRC for High Performance Soils, this project will address the issue that most Decision Support Systems (DSS) do not allow for complex soil constraints in their modelling.

Currently, the models and DSS used in Australian agriculture have a limited ability to represent a diversity of soil constraints and how these constraints interact to affect crop and pasture production. Essentially, only nitrogen fertility and soil water dynamics in dryland environments is well represented.

This project will improve already existing and widely used DSS (ARM Online, Yield Prophet and Soil Water App) through developing soil constraint modules to increase the reliability of predictions that can be used in the paddock.

Focusing on DSS with existing user bases will ensure early and rapid adoption and will provide enhanced decision support to the agricultural industry for addressing complex soil productivity and constraint challenges that limit farm productivity. Ultimately, this will help farmers and advisers to formulate interventions and new management strategies to improve productivity.

Incorporating developments into existing DSS will ensure that the project has a direct payoff to Australian farmers and will enable them to identify efficient strategies to address soil constraints to production for their specific circumstances. This represents a significant user base that will facilitate the early uptake of the projects outputs leading to rapid impacts.

Related Programs

Duration

Two and a half years

Participants

University of Southern Queensland
Federation University Australia
University of Tasmania
NSW Department of Primary Industries
Burdekin Productivity Services
Birchip Cropping Group
West Midlands Group
Riverine Plains

Completed Projects

Project 1.1.01

Activating markets to create incentives for improved soil management literature scoping study.

Project 1.1.01

Professor Mark Morrison – Project Leader
Charles Sturt University

The project developed a user manual for selecting, adapting and where necessary, creating and implementing market-based instruments.

Market-based instruments involve the identification or creation of financial or other incentives and, where needed, the removal or reduction of disincentives, for improved soil management within consumer or other markets.

The team of researchers from CSU, UTAS, USQ and UON working on this output developed potential project ideas in this area. They identified key issues and stakeholders, clarified program objectives and scoped out potential project areas.

They liaised with Soil CRC industry partners to clarify issues, provided an overview of market-based incentives, gauged their support for proposed projects and got insights into potential modifications to future projects.

Related Programs

Project 1.2.01

Scoping systems of acceptance of improved soil management, with a focus on decision support systems and tools.

Project 1.2.01

Associate Professor Catherine Allan – Project Leader
Charles Sturt University

The Soil CRC wil produce various outputs and products with the potential to increase the performance of agricultural soils in Australia. Farmers will only adopt and invest in products that are relevant, and to do this they need access to decision support systems (DSS). A comprehensive review determined the range, availability and suitability of existing DSS relevant to soil management.

The objective was to indicate the scope for the Soil CRC to use existing farmer decision support interfaces for the uptake and use of research outputs.

This scoping study review considered the broader context as well as scoped the existing DSS, and therefore supported the outputs of the Soil CRC.

They ran a series of facilitated on-line and in-person meetings among approximately 20 Soil CRC members working with Program 1.2 and 1.3, and in other Soil CRC Programs, in particular Program 4.

Related Programs

Project 2.1.01

A review of indicators of soil health and function: farmers’ needs and data management.

Project 2.1.01

Associate Professor Peter Dahlhaus – Project Leader
Federation University

The aim of this review was to determine which indicators would be most practical to improve profitability for Australian farmers.

This included examining whether we have suitable data available to measure and monitor trends, the tools to store, share and make this data available as well as determining what additional data is required, how they are best collected and ensuring that the data and tools are available beyond the life of the CRC.

As a scoping study, the outcomes will guide future CRC projects by providing a comprehensive review of the relevance of reliable, easily measurable and practical soil health and function indicators and their ability to link soil measurements with yield, productivity and profitability.

Project 2.2.01

Soil sensor technologies – which ones are most useful for smarter farming?

Project 2.2.01

Dr Marcus Hardie and Assoc Prof John Bennett – Project Leaders
University of Tasmania and University of Southern Queensland

The purpose of the review was to identify existing and prototype soil sensors for consideration by the Soil CRC for investment in research and development.

The review focused on proximal (installed in or immediately above the soil), point scale and mobile sensors and sensory systems. The review considered potential chemical, physical and biological sensors for indicating soil health, function or performance.

Emphasis was placed on reviewing sensors for priority soil attributes identified by growers in Project 2.1.01

Related Programs

Project 3.1.01

Review and meta-analysis of waste-derived fertiliser products, nano-porous materials for pesticide delivery, and moisture retention and microbial carrier technologies.

Project 3.1.01

Professor Chengrong Chen – Project Leader
Griffith University

Intensive agriculture has led to land degradation in some areas. Together with inefficient use of fertiliser and pesticides/herbicides, the productivity and sustainability of many agricultural systems in Australia is greatly limited.

The aim of this scoping study was to undertake a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of potential values of waste by-products and natural resources in Australia to be used for manufacturing new fertilisers, nano-porous materials for pesticide/herbicide delivery, and moisture retention and microbial carrier products.

The outcomes provided recommendations on the priorities for future research investment to meet Program 3 Milestone Output 1 (novel high performance fertiliser products), 2 (new low residual pesticide/ herbicide delivery systems) and 4 (effective delivery of beneficial microorganisms).

Related Programs

Project 3.3.01

Mapping projects on ameliorating soil constraints, and review of soil constraints, products and technologies.

Project 3.3.01

Dr Susan Orgill – Project Leader
NSW Department of Primary Industries

This project identified the location, scope and impact of current research investigating soil constraints to agricultural production, and reviewed the major soil constraints to Australian agriculture and the amelioration products and technologies to manage these constraints.

This project produced a report based on an objective needs assessment using an economic framework for prioritisation that will be critical in deciding the future research directions for Program 3.

Related Programs

Project 4.1.01

Scoping study to identify and prioritise regional soil constraints.

Project 4.1.01

Diana Parsons – Project Leader
Central West Farming Systems

This scoping study consulted with end users to identify the key issues that are contributing to lower production due to soil constraints so that the future research of program 4 (with aspects informing Program 3, output 3) can be directed and targeted to deliver outcomes in these areas.

A key deliverable of this study is the establishment of formal engagement between researchers and growers in the identification and prioritisation of issues. The on-ground relationships this scoping study established are critical to the successful adoption of future Soil CRC outcomes.

Related Programs

Project 4.3.01

Soil models, tools and data: Current state of play, future directions and setting up for longevity and a legacy from the CRC for High Performance Soils

Project 4.3.01

Dr Keith Pembleton – Project Leader
University of Southern Queensland

The suite of decision support systems (DSS) needed to be reviewed and assessed to ensure their effectiveness and their usefulness and longevity beyond the life of the Soil CRC.

This scoping project mapped, reviewed and assessed the landscape of the DSS, models and data. Recommendations have been made on how DSS developed through the Soil CRC can build on past research to have impact and longevity.

Related Programs